social media
how Social media work to client?

how Social media work to client?

  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

How Social media work to client

Let’s start by getting something out of the way: social media is here to stay. When more than three billion people around the world use social media every month, we can be sure that we are not dealing with a passing trend. Channels and formats may change, but a strong online presence can do wonders. Using eye-popping videos, pixel-perfect images, and engaging storytelling, social platforms help brands increase awareness, connect with their potential customers, and boost sales.

However, gone are the days when businesses used to post anything on Facebook and get huge amounts of reach, engagement, and sales. In a world where Internet users are constantly bombarded with content, people have become less receptive to brands’ messages. Marketing teams already know that not all content needs to be shared everywhere. 

That post suitable for Twitter may not be a good fit for other social media platforms, while that LinkedIn image that performed so well might not get any reactions on Facebook. After all, we don’t dress the same at a party and at work. We don’t make the same kind of jokes with our friends and with our grandparents, right? It’s the same with social media. Different environments and audiences require customized content.

But is this something that the client truly understands? How do you showcase your work in such a way that points out the advantages of personalized social media content? We won’t go into the topic of how to create a social media portfolio, but keep in mind that having a great portfolio is just the first step towards making your clients understand your vision and skills. Properly showcasing your work can help you make a good first impression on potential clients and build a stronger relationship with existing ones. With this in mind, we decided to tackle the topic of presenting your social media work to clients. The smart way. Ready, get set, read!

Target

Why does your client want to have a social media presence? Presenting your work the right way is tied to setting expectations early on and avoiding unpleasant surprises. Does the client need brand awareness? Or perhaps the company has just overcome a PR crisis and wants to make sure the brand regains users’ trust by being transparent, proactive, and accountable.

Whatever the reason, you need to go behind the scenes in order to set a clear list of goals and objectives. Prepare an audit of the client’s existing social media presence, do a competitive analysis, understand the brand’s audience, and come up with content that is tailored to their needs. You can’t skip these steps if you’re looking to build a long-term professional relationship with your client and get the desired results.

After doing your research, think about the extra things that can help you make a great first impression. It is not enough to know about the client’s past social media activity, but also about the company’s values, their overall website performance or technicalities they use (technical SEO matters like schema markup for instance). You can show them you’re really interested in their business by making content suggestions that support and emphasize their core values. It might help if you have similar clients in your social media portfolio to prove your experience in that industry, but it’s not mandatory. What is a social media portfolio? you may ask. Think of it as a set of pieces of creative work that you can use to demonstrate your social media skills. It can be anything from past posts to analytic reports. Since this article is not about this specific topic, you can check out this article from Social Media Pro on how to put together a portfolio and portfolio ideas for inspiration.

Now back to the client.  Don’t be afraid to address both the brand’s strengths and weaknesses. If you are going to work with this client, their problems become your problems as well. collabration  is one of the most common challenges in any business. The marketing department makes no exception. The good news is that you can learn to improve content collaboration and build a better creative workflow. It doesn’t happen overnight. There are some shortcuts though. Like taking a course created by content marketing experts.

In their constant running pace, social media marketers never stop to take a helicopter view and identify the obstacles. How efficient are clients’ processes when it comes to content? How much time and resources are lost due to poorly defined workflows? According to the “by Planable, it takes 5.4 days from the creation to the actual publishing of a piece of content, while a third of the time is spent on collaboration. With over 11 social media posts being published every week, we can agree that a lot of time goes into reaching that breathtaking point when the post is ready to go live

Getting to that special moment when the client’s truly happy with your work can involve endless email threads with Google Drive links, images, and video attachments. Add a couple of phone calls where the client rants about “the copy on row 7, column E”, and you can accurately picture a social media manager’s nightmare. Giving and receiving feedback is complicated when the context is missing and workflows are visibly flawed.

Fortunately, new tools are available to match the modern technologies being used in marketers’ day-to-day activities. There’s no need to rely on spreadsheets, phone calls, and emails anymore. Presenting your ideas for a brand’s social media accounts should be done using a dedicated solution

Smart goal

Your social media strategy should be built around the outcomes that you and your client want to achieve. Social media pages exist for several reasons, including a great many personal accounts that are held by consumers.

Businesses active on social media are typically trying to achieve more sales, but they would benefit from working backward from that point to help shape the strategy: what is it they can get from social media that will lead to sales further down the line?

Social media is a powerful tool to drive footfall in offline businesses, such as shops, bars, and restaurants. For example, if you’re running a restaurant, being present on social media allows you to see and target users by their location and age, both of which are valuable pieces of information when tailoring your marketing.

If your client’s business is solely online, then setting goals for driving referral traffic from your social media platforms is a good way to measure success over time, provided assisted conversions do come through and can be monitored in Google Analytics.

  • Specific
  • Measurable
  • Attainable
  • Results-focused
  • Time-bound

For example, if you were creating a strategy for an online magazine that makes money primarily by showing website adverts to users, you might set a SMART goal such as:

There are several benefits to goal-setting in this way. One is that it helps everyone in the team know, before the start of executing a new strategy, what results in they can feel great about driving and achieving.


  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *